People are living longer, but not necessarily healthier. It’s unsettling to think about it in these terms but, in our lifetime, it’s unlikely that any of the lifestyle related diseases—like obesity, diabetes and heart disease—will be cured by a pill. Yet the most effective weapons we have to battle chronic disease include more daily activity and exercise, a healthier diet and weight management, and lower stress — behaviors that are seemingly the most difficult to sustain.

Healthcare providers are at a distinct disadvantage in this battle against chronic conditions. Patients need intervention far before symptoms of a disease start to become evident. And then they need sustained, consistent support if we are to achieve true behavior change. While interventions such as mobile and digital health solutions have the potential to improve management of and even prevent some disease, our reimbursement system is better suited for acute care, and reimbursement for preventative care is sorely lacking. Health plans have tried, mostly without success, to cajole us to a healthier state.  Let’s face it:  the burden of chronic illness prevention is on the patient.

So, are we doomed? Is it time to throw in the towel and declare these chronic conditions the victor? I say not so fast.